Partnership self-assessment tool

A summary of

Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health. (2002). Partnership self-assessment tool questionnaire. Retrieved from https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10214/3129/Partnership_Self-Assessment_Tool-Questionnaire_complete.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y.

How to cite this NCCMT summary:

National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (2008). Partnership self-assessment tool. Hamilton, ON: McMaster University. (Updated 29 November, 2016) Retrieved from http://www.nccmt.ca/resources/search/10.

Categories: Tool, Evaluate, Partnership evaluation

These summaries are written by the NCCMT to condense and to provide an overview of the resources listed in the Registry of Methods and Tools and to give suggestions for their use in a public health context. For more information on individual methods and tools included in the review, please consult the authors/developers of the original resources.

Relevance for Public Health

Successful public health interventions, both in program implementation and the pooling of human and funding resources, depend on healthy organizational partnerships. Collaboration generates population-based strategies that allow individuals to obtain necessary clinical services while their communities work to address underlying problems that center on health promotion and disease prevention.

Description

Collaboration is a process where individuals view problems differently and work together to achieve solutions collectively as a group (Lasker, Weiss, & Miller, 2001). Collaboration is essential in public health since key partnerships can aid in the promotion of health and the prevention of disease. A high functioning partnership is synergistic; it involves the effectiveness of leadership, administration and management, the efficiency of the partnership, and the sufficiency of the partnership’s resources. Partnership is key in public health where multiple organizations work together to deliver complex population-based programming. Often, the effects of public health interventions are not seen within the population for many years. The success of these interventions relies on the commitment of many organizations and sectors. The “Partnership Self-Assessment Tool” was developed using the “Partnership Synergy Framework” (Lasker, et al., 2001) to provide a measurement of the key indicators for successful collaboration and level of synergy.

This 15-page “Partnership Self-Assessment Tool” contains a total of 67 questions. Eleven sections deal with the following topics:

  • synergy;
  • leadership;
  • efficiency;
  • administration and management;
  • non-financial resources;
  • financial and other capital resources;
  • decision making;
  • benefits of participation;
  • drawbacks of participation;
  • benefits and drawbacks of participating in the partnership;
  • satisfaction with participation.

Each section uses a Likert scale and/or yes and no questions. A Coordinator’s Guide is the main instructional resource for this tool.

Implementing the Method/Tool
Steps for Using Method/Tool

The Coordinator must first determine which individuals will complete the tool; if possible, all members should be instructed to complete the tool. A 30-day time period should be allotted for participants to complete and return the instrument. Because the tool is completed by hand it is important to maintain the confidentiality of respondents. Participants should be given instructions not to write their name. As well, steps must be taken to ensure that the method of returning the instrument does not reveal an individual’s identity. Covered bins or mailed questionnaires with no return address are two methods of ensuring that anonymity is maintained.

Who is involved

The tool was administered by a Project Coordinator. It is recommended that all members of the partnership fill out the questionnaire. However, they must be knowledgeable enough about the partnership to complete the tool.

Conditions for Use

The Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health suggests that partnerships:

  1. Exist for at least six months;
  2. Be a group of people involved in organizations that work together to achieve goals;
  3. Take action to implement plans;
  4. Have at least 5 active partners
Evaluation and Measurement Characteristics
Evaluation
Has been evaluated.

This tool was pilot tested in the National Study of Partnership Functioning. This study recruited 66 partnerships in 28 US states. The instrument underwent two rounds of psychometric testing to identify problematic items that were then revised for clarity, relevance and consistency. Evaluation results indicated that the mean of the individual response for each scale with a partnership was a good approximation of the partnership as a whole.

Validity
Validity properties meet accepted standards.

Construct validity was tested for the overall tool; the tool was examined against an existing scale that measured collaborative group performance (Weiss, Anderson, & Lasker, 2002). The two scales were highly correlated (r=0.71, p<0.01). Further testing showed that while the scales measured similar types of constructs, the tools were not identical. This is important as the analysis showed two key constructs for this tool – synergy and collaborative group performance (Weiss, et al. 2002).

Reliability
Reliability properties meet accepted standards.

Internal consistency was evaluated with the reporting of the Cronbach’s Alpha scores ranging from 0.82 (efficiency subscale) and 0.97 (leadership subscale) (Weiss, et al., 2002).

Methodological Rating
Strong
Method/Tool Development
Developer(s)

The Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health. This is an initiative of the Division of Public Health at the New York Academy of Medicine.

Method of Development

This tool is part of an overall “Partnership Synergy Framework” which attempts to address a gap in knowledge related to conceptualizing the functioning of health partnerships. Missing in the literature was an explanation of how partnership functioning influenced partnership effectiveness. The tool was tested and enhanced during the National Study of Partnership Functioning.

Release Date
2002
Contact Person/Source

Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health Division of Public Health New York Academy of Medicine

1216 Fifth Avenue, Room 452

New York, USA 10029-5293

Tel: (212) 822-7250

Fax: (212) 426-6796

Resources

Title of Primary Resource
Partnership self-assessment tool questionnaire
File Attachment
None
Web-link
Reference

Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health. (2002). Partnership self-assessment tool questionnaire. Retrieved from https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10214/3129/Partnership_Self-Assessment_Tool-Questionnaire_complete.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y.

Type of Material
Tool - Data collection
Format
On-line Access
Cost to Access
None.
Language
English
Conditions for Use

© Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health


Title of Supplementary Resource
Partnership self-assessment tool: Instructions for using the tool offline
File Attachment
None
Web-link
Reference

Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health. (2002). Partnership self-assessment tool: Instructions for using the tool offline. Retrieved from http://www.lmgforhealth.org/sites/default/files/Center_for_the_Advancement_of_Collaborative_Strategies_in_Health_%28CACSH%29_Parternship_Self-Assessments.pdf.

Type of Material
Format
On-line Access
Cost to Access
None.
Language
English
Conditions for Use

© Center for the Advancement of Collaborative Strategies in Health


Title of Supplementary Resource
Partnership synergy: A practical framework for studying and strengthening the collaborative advantage
File Attachment
None
Web-link
Reference

Lasker, R. Weiss, E., & Miller, R. (2001). Partnership synergy: A practical framework for studying and strengthening the collaborative advantage. The Milbank Quarterly, 79 (2), 179-205.

Type of Material
Journal
Format
Periodical
Cost to Access
None.
Language
English
Conditions for Use
None

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